Drug Developed at U of MN Increases Survival in Dogs with Cancer

The University of Minnesota recently published significant results involving a breakthrough trial which demonstrated improved survival rates for dogs diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma (HSA). (See the article in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics).

Emma - Sarcoma survivor dog

Canine HSA is a vascular cancer (involving blood vessels) and is very similar to angiosarcoma in humans. Both cancers are aggressive and spread before diagnosis, typically with devastating results.

The study used the UMN-developed drug eBAT which simultaneously targets the tumor and its vascular system. Results showed a substantial six-month survival rate for the 23 dogs in the study, with five dogs surviving beyond 450 days. The study also determined a dose of eBAT that allowed effective treatment with substantially fewer side effects.

The researchers believe the study’s positive results, along with the similarities between HSA and angiosarcoma in humans, make a strong case for potential clinical trials for human cancer patients.

Rein in Sarcoma was one of many funding sources for this research. See the announcement of 2017 RIS sarcoma research grants to the University of Minnesota.

For more details on the research study see the University of Minnesota press release. You can also view a KARE11 logo segment featuring this story.